George the Collie reviews – National Trust Moseley Old Hall

A local National Trust site, small but friendly.

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Situated just outside Wolverhampton, Moseley Old Hall is somewhere I have been past many times but never got around to visiting.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moseley_Old_Hall

Described as ‘An atmospheric Elizabethan farmhouse that saved a King’ I did a bit of digging before visiting finding that it had been used as a hiding place for the retreating King at the end of the English Civil War and includes a ‘Priest Hole’ actually used by the King to avoid his pursuers.

Being a dog, I’m not allowed in the house itself so have to be content with the outside and what an outside to enjoy! 

The (recreated) 17th century gardens are quite small but in keeping with the house itself, extending around three sides to include a seating area for picnics.

There are facilities on site, a souvenir ship, second hand book shop, plant sale area and a little tea room (which boasts the best scones in the world), but we just brought our own little picnic and coffee.

As you wander around the grounds there is a ‘Kings Walk’ through the tree to a tree house and pond.


It is a lot smaller than some better know. National Trust sites but this is reflected in entry price for non-members being smaller.

All in all, a nice little venue which is easy to visit just off J2 M54 (it can be noisy in parts as it is next door)

http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/moseley-old-hall/

George the Collie on Dog Friendships.

Dogs and dog friends….

The life of a hermit is more likely one chosen than enforced. People need to be with others, even if it’s for short periods. People need people.

It’s the same with dogs.


If your dog doesn’t go out, doesn’t get walked, has no contact with other dogs, how is it supposed to react when it sees another dog? That’s probably the second question your dog will ask itself on seeing another dog. Right after ‘WTF?’ 


So, to have the most balanced dog, it needs experiences, good and bad, of other dogs so that it learns how it feels when other dogs are about. If they don’t get this, how can you expect you dog to improve its social skills?

You can’t keep your dog locked away and then shout at it for losing its self control on seeing other dogs – it’s a natural reaction for the dog.

George has been socialised as much as we can from an early age, with people too, not just dogs and cats.

As such, he is a joy to take out. He is genuinely interested and excited to meet others and I can be confident he poses no threat to any of them. 


This confidence only comes from testing and knowing your dog. If you don’t help your dog – you’ll reap what you sow.

You dog loves being social so, please, give it every chance you can. 🐾

George the Collie Vs Training Pt.5

How size matters more than you may have thought….

Size matters. Apparently.

I don’t know if it’s the same for everyone else but one of the biggest training problems I experience is retaining the attention of the dog.

One of the contributors to this lack of attention could be the size of the treats and treat size vs dog size.

George would probably be classed as a medium sized dog when fully grown but, at 6 months old, he is some way off his maximum.

As a result, the size of the treats being used is quite important when it comes to getting and keeping him engaged.

When he does something right he is given a treat to re-inforce the good behaviour but if the treat has been too large, he takes time to eat it. As well as that, George likes to take his time over larger items and eat them away from others. This breaks up the flow of the training.

I have taken to using the smallest treat I can find for training. It’s easier as it’s a very quick treat and it reduces the break of attention.


The longer the training goes on, the more this seems to work.

It’s just something to consider – your dog will want the biggest treat they can snaffle off you but it may not be the best things for the learning.

George the Collie and the #DogBlog

Keep on posting, keep on writing and keeping the faith.

Over the years, I’ve had a dabble at writing a blog a couple of times but never really got it to stick. It might be motivation that was the issue but the whole ‘dog’ thing is a nice hobby, a good distraction from the downsides of general life.

Third time lucky maybe as I am managing to publish posts with some regularity. 

I know most of it is dog related and this probably helps with the posts as George is a fairly regular source of inspiration for content.

I do a lot of posting on social media and that does alright for contacts and it’s nice having that interaction with so many people. It would be nice to have that level of contact via this blog too.

I know that, for some people, this is their job, their life and they have made a business out of it – I certainly don’t have time for that – but that is not this blog. You see some people tailor their content to suit the current issues of the day and, again, that’s not this blog. 

There will be some ‘current’ stuff being posted but, mainly, its dog related and maybe that’s why blogging is so punishing to the writer. A post on social media can garner a lot of attention and validation for the poster but, on this platform, that’s not how it works.

I am still finding my feet. 

This is sometimes me just emptying my head in the guise of a pooch and now and again I’ll get some feedback which I really appreciate.

It’s just odd sometimes. 

A friend of mine joined Twitter some years back. They were on Facebook and, for some reason, presumed it worked the same. They started following a few friends and celebrities and made a few posts but then complained that he wasn’t getting any interactions with anyone.

His posts were like ‘Wow, big night. BIG head this morning’. Harmless enough but he had no #hashtags and , most importantly, no followers. I explained to him this was the equivalent of sitting at home alone talking to the TV 📺 but I don’t think he understood. 

But, writing these posts, I can help but think if I am doing something similar – almost. As I said, it’s nice getting comments and chatting with viewers but it can be disheartening. 

I will carry on though. If anything, it’s cathartic – almost confessional at times – and good to get things out of my head rather than have them fester.

So, to those that do view my posts, to those that take time to comment and give me feedback, I thank you. 👍🏻

George the Collie Vs Training Pt.4

The importance of meeting…..

It’s important for a dog to have new experiences but chief among them is meeting new people and animals.

George starts his puppy course in 3 weeks so I am trying to have him me as many other folks and pets as possible.

When we first had George, he was nervous of most things and would react defensively to dog, cats and people.

We have walked him a lot, meeting as many folk as we can and encouraging him that all was okay. Taking him into new situations has improved his acceptance of new things and he now actively seeks out new meets.


By having him do this he no longer has any problems with other dogs either, and cats (he is friends with a local Burmese, Bob).

This all bodes well for his course and hopefully he will be less distracted by other dogs and therefore able to focus better.

George the Collie Vs Food Construction 

Food needs a solid foundation….

I don’t eat much restaurant food, I’m more of a kibble kind of guy but I have observed a few odd things.

Food. Some of it ‘looks’ great but watching it being eaten shows it’s far from being great.

Watching a burger 🍔 in a brioche bun disintegrate as it is being eaten doesn’t look like much fun or value for money.


Building food 🥘 should be like building house. Solid foundations. A good soup needs a good base.

You would not build the Empire State Building out of wood and you would not accept a poorly constructed property collapsing around you.

Keep it simple Chef!

A short, behind the scenes interview with a young Border Collie dog about his preference in toys.

Just a short interview with a dog.