George the Collie reviews National Trust Shugborough Hall

Some work to do but still a great visit.


Set in mid-Staffordshire, Shugborough Hall is the ancestral home of the Earls of Lichfield

The hall and grounds have recently been taken over by the National Trust as, as you might expect, things are not fully up to speed.

Being a dog, I’m not allowed in the house so just the grounds for me but I have to say they are some of the better one I have been around.

There are (partially) defined paths to follow around and areas where dogs can run free, thankfully. They were great.

There are some beautiful sights as you amble around but my folks got lost quite quickly due to poor path marking. We all muddled through okay though and made it back to the modern world.

There are a large number of ‘follys’ (follies?) around the grounds but there used to be a lot more, 11 in fact.

The gatehouse leads you along the road to the deer/cattle grazing areas which are vast.

There is an art ‘thing’ going on around the grounds as well where you can look into these viewers, below, and watch an art house piece relating to the history of the park and the two brother that brought ‘paradise’ to the grounds in the shape these follies. Inspiration taken from their travels the area was transformed.

Unfortunately, many of these were destroyed or neglected over time leaving only a few remaining which can be found about.

The arch of Hadrian, above, is the most visible one remaining but there are still the Doric Temple, The Tower of the Winds, The Shepherd’s Monument and more to see.

We did make use of the fabulous tea room though. That clotted cream was lovely.

A nice park and well worth a visit. Not seen the house yet but we’ll go back. The grounds still have some way to go but still a nice spot.

George the Collie reviews National Trust Attingham Park.

A very big house in the country.

So, Attingham Park.
It is what you'd expect from The National Trust, vast, sprawling and picture perfect.

The 'home' itself was not as big as I was expecting but it is still lovely.
I think it's neo-classical in design (that what I told everyone!) and is beautifully laid out.

The front (above) has a fantastic view over immaculate fields with cows grazing.

The stable block has been really well converted into food, shop, toilets etc. Really well done.

Attingham is brimming with histoty – take a look 👀!

There is a long, diverse and winding walking route around the grounds which has an area you can take dogs around and even let them off in certain areas.

As the walk makes it way around the grounds, we came across a huge herd of deer 🦌 which seemed quite comfortable with people ambling around.

The tea room was great and, in the winter, we'll return for a good mooch through the house.
But just the grounds made it well worth the journey.

George the Collie reviews National Trust Wightwick Manor, Wolverhampton.

Another Wolverhampton historic gem.

Set in the outskirts of the city, Wightwick Manor is another 'blink and you miss it' National Trust site that has a lot going for it.

Ample parking leads you to the entrance where the staff are very welcoming and informative – handing out maps and details to assist your visit.

From here you head to the house itself which, probably by design, just pops out from behind beautifully manicured hedgerows.

Built in the Arts & Crafts style in 1887 by the local Mander industrialist family, Wightwick Manor is a relatively 'new' property compared to a lot of National Trust sites.

The house itself was built in two main sections, the second finished in 1897, and was fully furnished and decorated in a style drawing heavily on the influence of William Morris

There are formal gardens and orchards to amble around and a lovely, if short, woodland walk leading to some very picturesque seating areas overlooking duck ponds.

The 'Great Parlour' is a beautiful space with stunning glass and an interior that has to be seen to take it all in.

With the standard coffee shop and site shop, Wightwick Manir has everything you could want for a quick day out.
A lovely site in a lovely location and definitely worth the admission.

George the Collie reviews National Trust Long Mynd.

Natural Glory……

Long Mynd is a geological beauty.

Carved out (probably) by glacial activity thousands of years ago, we’re left with the wreckage – and it’s stunning.

We parked up at Cardingmill Valley where the National Trust site is. 

There is plenty of parking, an information centre and tea room which is very well equipped.

From here you can make use of the readily available information sheets for easy, medium and hard walks in the area or you can strike out in your own – which is what we did. 

An hour and a half later, three tough miles and one picnic consumed, we returned to the centre for an ice cream.

We were blessed with beautiful weather today but I honestly think you’d love this place regardless.

Even with the car park full once we were off walking, there was hardly anyone else around.

Amazing views, routes and great facilities make this a must visit. 

George the Collie reviews – National Trust Moseley Old Hall

A local National Trust site, small but friendly.

Situated just outside Wolverhampton, Moseley Old Hall is somewhere I have been past many times but never got around to visiting.

Described as ‘An atmospheric Elizabethan farmhouse that saved a King’ I did a bit of digging before visiting finding that it had been used as a hiding place for the retreating King at the end of the English Civil War and includes a ‘Priest Hole’ actually used by the King to avoid his pursuers.

Being a dog, I’m not allowed in the house itself so have to be content with the outside and what an outside to enjoy! 

The (recreated) 17th century gardens are quite small but in keeping with the house itself, extending around three sides to include a seating area for picnics.

There are facilities on site, a souvenir ship, second hand book shop, plant sale area and a little tea room (which boasts the best scones in the world), but we just brought our own little picnic and coffee.

As you wander around the grounds there is a ‘Kings Walk’ through the tree to a tree house and pond.

It is a lot smaller than some better know. National Trust sites but this is reflected in entry price for non-members being smaller.

All in all, a nice little venue which is easy to visit just off J2 M54 (it can be noisy in parts as it is next door)